Ferrari Announces Four New Models Will Debut In 2023

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Financial results are usually boring to read, but when you’re a Ferrari, you do your best to spice up press releases. One point that caught our attention was the news about Maranello’s plans to introduce no less than four new models. While deliveries of the Purosangue to customers have yet to start, this high-performance SUV is nothing new since the practical Prancing Horse introduced in 2022.

With Ferrari being Ferrari, the exotic Italian marque is keeping a secret on what we’ll see later this year. Based on what the car paparazzi have been able to see in recent months, one of the four vehicles will likely be a convertible version of the Rome. It will be interesting to see if the open-top grand tourer will replace the Portofino M, which has been in the tooth for a while. There would also be a risk of cannibalizing the sale, but some reports point to the Roma Spider (name not confirmed) will be placed under Portofino without actually replacing it.

The spy photographer also caught a test mule based on the Roma but packing the power of a V12. It’s supposed to be the replacement for the 812 Superfast and we might see it before the end of 2023. The potentially hotter Stradale SF90 seen last November hides an elongated body, so be prepared for a “Versione Speciale” or something like that.

For the fourth and final model, your guess is as good as ours. We’re not ruling out another ultra-exclusive model for the Icona series to follow up the Monza SP1/SP2 and Daytona SP3. Ferrari has been putting out more limited cars and one-off projects, so maybe something special is coming in 2023.

For the period 2023-2026, Ferrari has promised to launch 15 cars, including its first EV and hypercar. Meanwhile, 2022 was a record-breaking year with 13,221 cars sold, prompting the Maranello house to award employees nearly $15,000 in bonuses.

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